How Mayors Can Be The Conduit For Climate Concerns

By path2positive

Americans are increasingly becoming concerned with how climate affects the health and well being of their families and communities. They are looking for leadership from all levels of government—local, state, and federal. However, in a new report released by the Center for American Progress, researchers found that the climate concerns of the American public is being vastly underserved by their congressional representative.

It is up to American voters to decide which issues are most important to them, and surely many are unaware of the climate and policy positions of those who represent their interests. This is where local leadership comes in. Mayors and local climate leaders must take on the task of communicating and educating residents in their cities about the consequences and opportunities presented by a changing climate. Mayors must emphasize the importance of bold action and lead by example, but also communicate the importance of climate solutions at the state and federal levels.

By empowering residents with the knowledge, benefits, and opportunities created by climate action, mayors can lead their constituents to pressure their representatives in congress to act. Learn how to become a climate leader in your community by joining Path to Positive Communities!


Most Americans Disagree With Their Congressional Representative On Climate Change

By Kristen Ellingboe & Ryan Koronowski | Think Progress Climate | March 8, 2016

According to new research from the Center for American Progress Action Fund, more than six in ten Americans are represented by someone in Congress who denies the reality of climate change.

Following the second straight year that earned the title of hottest year on record, 59 percent of the Republican House caucus and 70 percent of Republicans in the Senate deny the scientific consensus that climate change is happening and humans are the main cause. There are 182 climate deniers in the 114th Congress in 2016 — 144 in the House and 38 in the Senate. According to the U.S. Census, that means 202,803,591 people are represented by a climate denier in Congress.

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